Lights, Camera, Action!

A Reflection of The Play That Goes Wrong

Actors+apart+of+the+Homicidal+Cast+perform+the+production+to+the+audience.+The+Play+That+Goes+Wrong+made+its+first+debut+on+Nov.+11%2C+2022+and+ran+until+Nov.19.+2022.

Ram Snaps

Actors apart of the Homicidal Cast perform the production to the audience. The Play That Goes Wrong made its first debut on Nov. 11, 2022 and ran until Nov.19. 2022.

Amidst its 40 year legacy, Robinson’s Rambunctious Theater Company (RTC) is known for its outstanding student performances and is home to many Cappy wins. The Play That Goes Wrong made its first debut on Nov. 11, 2022. Students and their families gathered to get a first glimpse at the newly created production, which centered around a murder mystery play. Derived off of the Broadway production, the performance contained a play within a play that created a unique experience for the audience. The three layered cast consisted of the Killer Cast, Murder Cast, and the Homicidal Cast, which allowed for a new experience each night as guests followed the humorous murder mystery play as mishaps continued to occur before the final curtain call.

Photo by Ram Snaps. Junior Parker Mott performing as he portrays Denis as the actor Perkins in the Homicidal Cast. Mott’s favorite part about show nights are the cast’s green room traditions that take place before getting ready.

Junior Parker Mott, five year member of RTC, played the role of Denis as the actor Perkins in the Murder Cast. Mott’s favorite part about show nights are the green room traditions the cast takes part in before getting ready. When reflecting on the play’s challenges, Mott said, “the most challenging part for me has probably been the blocking because everyone is doing something slightly different, so trying to make sure everyone knows what they’re doing and we’re all doing the same thing, is really difficult.” Actors noted that blocking became a major challenge with a triple cast. 

Photo by Ram Snaps. Senior Ian Toppall on stage as he portrays Robert as the actor Thomas in the Homicidal Cast. Toppall loves the shared energy between the actors and the audience on show nights.

Senior Ian Toppall, six year member of RTC, played the role of Robert as the actor Thomas in the Killer Cast. Toppall loves the shared energy between the cast and audience on show nights. “There’s a mutual appreciation that the actors are appreciative of the audience for being there and the audience is of course appreciative of the actors for putting on the show,” Toppall said. Due to multiple casts, Mott and Toppall both enjoyed watching their fellow peers play the characters they knew and loved. Mott said, “we get to watch each other perform and we get ideas and we can actually bounce our ideas off someone and it’s really fun to see them do so well and transfer that into the performance yourself.”

Senior Kate Wamboldt, six year member of RTC, played the role of Sandra as the actor Florence in the Homicidal Cast. Wamboldt’s favorite part about working on this production has been her cast members. “I just really like working with them,” she said. “They’re not really people that I’ve known that well before this, so not only being able to understand their skillset and how it works with mine, but also getting closer through the process, is definitely fun.” On show nights, Wamboldt enjoys the process of getting ready for the show through hair and makeup, costumes, and chatting with fellow cast members.

Senior Kate Wamboldt posing as she portrays Sandra as the actor Florence in the Homicidal Cast. On show nights, Wamboldt enjoys the process of getting ready for the show through hair and makeup, costumes, and chatting with fellow cast members. (Ram Snaps)  

High school drama teacher, Megan Thrift, has been working as a Robinson drama teacher for nine years. Ever since she was a little girl, Thrift knew she wanted to be a teacher, but it was not until she joined her high school theater program that she knew teaching drama was the right path for her. Prior to teaching at Robinson, Thrift helped teach drama to students at various theater companies. Thrift believes that drama is for everyone of all passions and talents. “It’s about telling human stories and human connections and there’s no SOL test that can encompass all that.” Watching her students try new things, fail, and then get back up, is Thrift’s favorite part about being a drama teacher.

When speaking to what she hoped the audience would get out of the play, Thrift said, “I hope they will laugh until their stomachs hurt. I hope that they find joy. I hope that predominantly what they find is a little bit of hope or at least a reminder that even if things are going horribly wrong, you can fail and still get back up and keep going.” Thrift believes that the audience can gain important lessons like these that do not just have to be learned from sadness and trauma, but that it is “just as powerful to remind them through the fun.”

Although the play ran for a limited amount of time to make way for future productions, its dedication is seen through the vivid details and performances noted by the audience. “I think it’s perfect,” said Thrift. “I love the comedy that doesn’t make fun of any particular person, but just enjoys people as they are.” The Play That Goes Wrong will be known for its remembrance and legacy for years to come.