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Summer Internships and Jobs: Q&A with Student Participants

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Junior Kyle Paget – Governor’s School

Q: What are you working as?                                                                       

A: A student at Governor’s School for the Humanities.

Q: What does this job entail?

A: It’s a four week program, and I attend classes in the subject. There are two core courses and then you have electives. There are about 200 other people… and we do bonding activities. I was told to bring a yoga mat, so it should be interesting.

Q: What sparked your interest?

A: It sounded great! I really like the subject and will enjoy reading all the humanities stuff without school pressures of grades. I can add some more books to my “read” list. I’m also really excited to meet new people, make friends. Plus, it’s free!

Q: How did you find this job?

A: Career Center!

Q: Tips for getting a good summer job?

A: Use the internet, your friends, College & Career Center.

Junior Eden Tadesse – educational volunteering

Q: What are you working as?

A: A volunteer at Georgetown University’s Medstar Summer hospital program.

Q: What does this job entail?

A: It’s an eight week program with both internal and external work. Internal work is helping patients by bringing them things they need or comforting them. I’ll also be making copies and taking phone calls. External work is running errands.

Q: What sparked your interest?

A: I’m really interested in diagnosis and what goes into that. I also like neurology; the brain is really fascinating. It has so much power we don’t even know about.

Q: How did you find this job?

A: The Career Center sent out an email. Georgetown is so renowned, I just had to look into the opportunity.

Q: What resources would you recommend to other students in the market?

A: The Career Center.

Q: Tips for getting a sumer job?

A: Don’t just do it because you think colleges want to see it. The employers ask why you want to do it, so if you’re not genuine you will be frustrated when you don’t get the job. Do it because you want to.

 

Junior Ellen Burdell – civil service volunteer work

Q: What are you working as?

A: A volunteer at Eagle Hill Equine Rescue. It’s a center for horses rescued from an array of places – abused or ignored – but they do often have a few horse mare foals. Fertility companies for women harvest [estrogen], a chemical that is in a mare’s urine only when they are pregnant, they impregnate mares for the purpose of collecting it and then have a foal with nowhere to put it. That’s where places like Eagle Hill come in.

Q: What does this job entail?

A: Sometimes it’s feeding them, but mostly the horses need to be socialized, because there are so many. They need to be given affection so that they are used to people and can be adopted.

Q: What sparked your interest?

A: I’ve always had a soft spot for helping animals that need it, and they do.

Q: How did you find this job?

A: A family friend told me.

Q: Tips for getting a good summer job?

A: Use the internet.

 

Freshman Johnny Sharp – paid summer job

Q: What are you working as?

A: I’m an umpire for little league baseball.

Q: What does this job entail?

A: I referee the games. It began in April and goes until July, and I get paid per game.

Q: What sparked your interest?

A: I used to play baseball as a catcher, but I quit to become an umpire.

Q: How did you find this job?

A: My coach recommended it to me.

Q: Tips for getting a good summer job?

A: You have to work for it. Look for a job you’ll enjoy and have fun doing.

 

Eileen Doyle, Career Center Specialist, discusses summer jobs for students

Q: Where should kids look?

A: There are not a lot of internships for high school students, but kids can always try a “job shadow” approach. Ask parents, neighbors, relatives. The job market’s tight, but going in person can really help your chances. Hit a bunch of businesses, like University Mall, and go in person to show companies you’re present, and ready to work.

Q: Why get a job?

A: Monetary purposes like getting pocket money or funds for college. It also shows colleges you’re ready to work for your education, and you’re interested in learning and your research is purposeful. It shows that you’re responsible.

Q: What resources should kids use?

A: Go online to snagajob.com and enter your zip code to find local jobs. Again, go in person to see who is hiring. Let people know you’re looking, so tell your neighbors and friends; you never know where opportunities will come from. We also have a bulletin board on the end of the wall outside the Career Center that lists opportunities for teens.

Q: What makes for happiness at a job?

A: You get out of it what you put into it. You can learn a lot of skills that you’re never too young to learn. Being responsible, on time and managing money, for example.

Q: What types of work should be considered?

A: Unemployment is so high, you can’t be too picky. Of course, look for something you’ll enjoy, but don’t be too picky if it’s not something in your “field”. If your goal is looking for money, take what you can get.

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Summer Internships and Jobs: Q&A with Student Participants